Blog iconTake-aways from “Another Women in Cybersecurity Panel”, VP of Engineering Jennifer Minella featured

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Take-aways from “Another Women in Cybersecurity Panel”, VP of Engineering Jennifer Minella featured

Eleanor Dallaway, Editor and Publisher of Infosecurity Magazine captured our VP of Engineering’s comments in her highlight rel recap of the (ISC)2 Security Congress panel on A Snapshot of Women in Information Security. In her writeup, Eleanor captures the essence of a positive and light-hearted conversation with a few controversial twists, and she explains why she was drawn to yet “Another Women in Cybersecurity Panel”.

Read the full article at https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/blogs/isc2congress-another-women-in/

Women in cybersecurity panels aren’t all that rare these days. In fact, I almost skipped the one on the agenda at (ISC)2 Congress in Austin this week because I feel like I’ve been to so many that perhaps I need to take a break.

However, I’d heard two of the panelists speak before (Jennifer Minella and Suzanne Hall) and have always liked what they had to say, so I changed my mind and went along.

Before I go on, I should probably list the panelists. The panel was moderated by freelance journalist Karen E. Hoffman. On the panel were Jennifer Minella, VP Engineering and consulting CISO at Carolina Advanced Digital; Suzanne Hall, managing director at PWC; and Lynn Terwoerds, executive director at Executive Women’s Forum (by the way, if you haven’t been to the EWF event in Arizona, do it, you won’t regret it).

Rather than reporting on the entire panel, which was lengthy (but good lengthy…the panelists were engaging and interesting), I am going to just pick out a few of the more interesting things that were said and share those with you.

Minella, who hates the term glass ceiling, had a slightly different take, although acknowledged that unconscious bias is very real. “Instead of starting from a point of saying there should be no bias, we should accept that from a neuroscience perspective, there will always be bias. It’s part of being human. So we need to acknowledge that there IS bias as a starting point, and then work from there.”

If our industry had a mascot or personality, it’s the grumpy, skeptical paranoid guy or the guy in a black hoodie in a basement…Jennifer Minella
 

 

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